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Home > Autos, Planes & Bikes > Detailing Supplies & Tips > Detailing Tips > Anthony's Kompressor Tips

Anthony's Kompressor Tips

Anthony's Kompressor Tips A review and video by Antony Orosco of Concours Auto Salon, San Antonio, TX.

Lake Country's new Kompressor Pads.

The Kompressor Pads are designed to cut down on sling and provide the user with a very smooth operation. The hundreds of individually cut blades compress with the weight of the polisher, allowing the pad to conform to the shape of the area being polished.

Because of the blades, there is no sling whatsoever (provided not too much product is used). In our testing, the Kompressor pads also seem to have a better cutting ability compared to equivalent ppi pads.

The pads work well with orbitals (such as the Flex) and hold-up through numerous cleanings with the Lake Country Pad Washer. I originally thought the "foam blades" would rip apart and could hold debris, but neither has been the case. The pads are very durable and do not hold debris within the foam blades. I have used the pads with various products such as Menzerna, Meguiars and Optimum.

I believe that these new Kompressor pads will soon be your favorite. I know they are for me.

Kompressor Pad Video:

We had a Nissan GTR come into our shop for a ding removal on the driver side rear quarter panel. I inspected the paint with good lighting and saw the paint was very scratched.

I began some research into the new, GTR "self healing" paint. Few detailers have had experience with it and many were attacking this unconventional paint through conventional means.

The more we fiddled with the paint, the more I was convinced it should be treated with a different mindset. We are now working with Nissan of North America to develop a "standard" method of care.

Instead of attacking the paint in an aggressive manner with a cutting pad (orange, yellow or wool) to remove scratches, I opted for Lake Country's new, White Kompressor Pad and Optimum's new Finishing Polish.

We used a rotary at 1500 rpm's for the first pass (Kompressor White Polishing Pad & finishing polish) working slowly. This allowed slightly more heat build-up than normal. We followed with a Kompressor Black Finishing Pad, using the same polish. We worked at a lower, 1000 rpm (tapering off from 1500).

Our last step was applied with the Flex Orbital Polisher and another Kompressor Black Finishing Pad. We applied Optimum Opti-Seal as the final wax. We were happy with the results and more importantly, so was the owner of the Nissan.